Presentation on Cancer

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First Look: Samsung’s Galaxy Beam Android Phone with a Built-In Projector

Samsung Sunday announced its first phone of Mobile World Congress (MWC), the Samsung Galaxy Beam, an Android smartphone with a built-in projector. The Galaxy Beam will be available globally in the second quarter of this year. MWC, which officially starts Monday in Barcelona, SSamsung Galaxy Beam Android smartphone with projectorpain, is the world’s largest mobile show.

Projector phones (and mobile projector accessories) have been around for some time, but they tend to be on the chunky and not-so-attractive side. The Galaxy Beam measures only 0.49 inches while packing in a 15 lumens projector. Most pico projector accessories sold today are only 10 or 12 lumens bright.

Samsung Galaxy Beam Android smartphone with projectorThe Galaxy Beam can project video, images or PowerPoint presentations up to 50-inches wide. The resolution of projected video is 640-by-360 pixels. Samsung did a quick demo projector image quality. The image clarity was impressive: colors looked vivid and the picture looked sharp. In other demos of pico projectors I’ve seen, colors looked washed out, while images and text looked faded.

Here’s an upclose look at the Beam:

Your Body Heat Could Someday Charge Your Phone

By Joshua SchnellPCWorld    Feb 24, 2012 2:54 PM

Graduate student Corey Hewitt works with a sample of thermoelectric fabric in the Nanotechnology lab. [Photo: Wake Forest University]

Move over, solar power; there’s a new environmentally friendly source of power in town. Instead of harvesting the sun’s energy, it draws from another source of heat–your body. Read more of this post

Science: Too Many Connections Weakens Networks

When it comes to connecting networks or other systems together, it is best to have many, but not too many, connections, mathematicians have found.

Administrators and network engineers have long assumed that the more connections they insert between multiple networks the more resilient the communications between these networks will be. The Internet, for example, derives much of its resiliency from multiple, redundant links. But this is true only up to a point. Too many connections can actually be dangerous, because failures in one network can easily cascade to the other, noted Charles Brummitt, a mathematics researcher at the University of California, Davis, who led a team that looked into this issue.

Instead, network owners should fine-tune the number of connections for maximum resiliency, Brummitt said.

Brummitt’s team published its work in this week’s issue of the “Proceedings of The National Academies of Science.”

The work is a mathematical model of how a collection of systems works together. “We’re taking a larger view and studying networks of networks,” he said. Interconnected networks can be vulnerable to cascading failures, in which a failure, or overload, in one network can disrupt another network. In a typical scenario, when one network is overloaded, it will offload its traffic to the second network. But if a failure is enough to overwhelm the first network, it may overwhelm the second network as well. Read more of this post

Intel Ponders Solar-powered CPU Tech in Graphics, Memory

By Agam ShahIDG News    Feb 19, 2012 9:50 pm

Intel’s experimental solar-powered processor may have started off as a fun project, but the chip maker is now looking to extend the technology to hardware such as graphics processors, memory and floating point units.

Intel last year showed the low-power processor — charged only by the light from a reading lamp — running Windows and Linux PCs. Intel is expected to share further details about the processor, which is code-named Claremont, at the International Solid-State Circuits Conference in San Francisco next week.

The CPU, which is the size of a postage stamp, is also known as the near-threshold voltage (NTV) CPU for its ability to keep operating at extremely low voltage levels. The CPU’s power consumption could go down to as little as 280 millivolts when running at 3MHz, and up to 1.2 volts when running at around 1Ghz when more performance is needed.

The NTV CPU is designed to bring extreme energy efficiency to computing devices, said Justin Rattner, Intel’s chief technology officer, in a briefing ahead of the show.

“It’s allowing us to make Intel’s product more [power efficient] across the compute continuum” while reaching appropriate performance levels, Rattner said. Read more of this post